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Kinases Inhibitors

Summary:

Kinases are an intracellular communications network that cells use to communicate stimuli from the cell membrane to the nucleus so it can react to its environment,” explains Jeffry Vaught, Ph.D.[1]  One of the functions of kinases in the cell is to communicate when it is time for apoptosis: a mechanism that enables organisms to eliminate cells that are no longer needed or are seriously damaged. In a neurological disease like Parkinson’s disease, the apoptosis of neurons is an unwanted event.[2]  Kinases inhibitors work by interfering with the function of apoptosis. Another term for this is kinases apopotis inhibitors.

Potential benefits:

  • Neuroprotective

  • Slows cell death

  • Retards disease progression

  • Reverses the severity of symptoms by improving the function of surviving neurons

Risks:

  • Turning off cell death may lead to increased risk of cancer

Past research:

PRECEPT - Cephalon/Lundbeck phase II/III clinical trial of CEP-1347.

CEP-1347 is a small molecule inhibitor of the mixed-lineage kinase (MLK) family of kinases. In cell cultures and animal models, CEP-1347 has shown the ability to slow cell death. CEP-1347 showed potential to both retard Parkinson’s disease progression and also reverse the severity of symptoms by improving the function of surviving neurons.[3]

In May 2005 Cephalon halted the CEP-1347 trial after interim results were reviewed. They concluded that the data were "unlikely to provide evidence of significant effect."[4]

CEP-1347 was a multi-year, 800-patient Phase II/III clinical trial in collaboration with H. Lundbeck A/S. The trial ended on May 11, 2005.[4][5]


[1] Cephalon, Interview with Jeffry Vaught, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, and President of Research and Development

[2] Cephalon, March 10, 2005

[3] Abstract: Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Vol. 44: 451-474 (Volume publication date February 2004), (doi:10.1146/annurev.pharmtox.44.101802.121840) First posted online on September 8, 2003

[4] Cephalon and H. Lundbeck Announce Discontinuation of CEP-1347 Clinical Trial in Parkinson's Disease, 5/11/05

[5] Cephalon, retrieved date: March 10, 2005

Copyright© 2012 Pipeline Project

All rights reserved. Revised: 01/26/12.